New Study Reveals Black Women Viewed as “Masculine;” Asian Men Sterotyped “Feminine.” How This Affects Swirling.

A study released by Columbia Business School revealed that race is often assigned a gender along a spectrum. Black people are viewed as “masculine,” regardless of whether the subject is male or female, and Asian people as a whole are viewed as “feminine.”

Within the heterosexual dating market, men tend to prefer women who personify the feminine ideal while women prefer men who embody masculinity. Galinsky showed that men are more attracted to Asian women relative to black women, while women are more attracted to black men relative to Asian men. Even more interesting, the more a man valued femininity the more likely he was attracted to an Asian women and the less likely he was attracted to an black women. The same effect occurred for women, with attraction to masculinity driving the differential attraction to black men and Asian men.

This news is not surprising to me, which is why I made the video, “Why the Strong Black Woman Must Die.”

 

I’d also like to “kill” what this woman represents for black women:

The grotesque neck-twirling, lip screwed up ball-busting black woman is what many people think of when they conjure up images of black women.

Never mind that I know more black women that look and act like this woman…

Most of my African American girlfriends embody the many of the qualities of our first lady.

Asian Men are ‘Soft?”

No need for a towel. This man is so hot that water will boil right off.

Conversely, Asian men are viewed as “soft” or “feminine” by other racial groups. Think about how this impacts swirling. The masculine stereotype attributed to black people benefits black men when it comes to interracial dating, and one can suggest the data supports this. The researchers looked at 2000 Census data and saw that “among black-white marriages, 73 percent had a black husband.” The “feminine” stereotype benefits Asian women, which the data also supports, but leaves Asian men in the lurch, just the same as how the “masculine” stereotype dings black women